Friday, November 6, 2020

Lectionary 32 A - Matthew 25:1-13

                                      

Ain Vares Art
Matthew 25:1-13
I think the parable of the wise and foolish bridesmaids should be called the parable of the tardy groom. And what about the bride waiting at the altar? I bet she was more than a little upset. “Midnight? Really?” Of course none of that is the point of the parable, well, except the tardy part. Mathew’s community is wondering what happened to Jesus. After all he said “this generation shall see my return” (Matthew 24:34) and that generation is almost all dead by the time this parable is written down. So the point of the parable is verse 13 and none of the details really matter except as a promise and on the flip side a warning. If you are awake and waiting faithfully you are wise and it doesn't matter how long it takes for the groom to arrive because your invitation is as good as gold. But if you grow tired of waiting and doubt the promise you are foolish and your lamp will go out and you’ll be left in the dark. So what does it mean for us over 2000 years later? I suppose the message is the same since we neither know the time or the date of Jesus’ return. But maybe more importantly the message is for us to use our waiting time wisely as Jesus will say at the end of this chapter. “When I was hungry you fed me, in prison you visited me, naked you clothed me, a stranger you welcomed me, thirsty you gave me drink.” We don’t just sit around in the glow of our lit lamps and sing Kum by Yah. We wait by living into the charge that is given to the baptized when the baptismal candle is presented. “Let your light so shine before others that they will see your good works and glorify your Father in heaven.” So let’s get busy waiting.

2 comments:

  1. I’ve wondered sometimes if maybe “this generation shall see my return” points to Pentecost, and Jesus’ return within us by the power of the Holy Spirit. The groom might not be tardy after all. We love to focus on God’s earthly power, on Jesus’ physical return as an act of somehow justifying our faith. When instead Jesus return within us, individually and in community with others, enables us to serve the creation given into our care. Which, in part leads us to the same conclusion....”When was I hungry and you fed me?”

    ReplyDelete
  2. I’ve wondered sometimes if maybe “this generation shall see my return” points to Pentecost, and Jesus’ return within us by the power of the Holy Spirit. The groom might not be tardy after all. We love to focus on God’s earthly power, on Jesus’ physical return as an act of somehow justifying our faith. When instead Jesus return within us, individually and in community with others, enables us to serve the creation given into our care. Which, in part leads us to the same conclusion....”When was I hungry and you fed me?”

    ReplyDelete